And it’s (nearly) here

So finally, Dear Reader, we can explain all the Dreamtime Damsels malarkey. For here is the precious tome itself…

Including a story featuring the marvellous Miss Henderson as well as many stories from our friends, available Sep 25 – we heartily, excitedly and proudly recommend it.

The Benthic Week?

Ah! You noticed our little teaser … and the prolonged gap between posts. Let me furnish you with an explanation for all of the above.

First, The Benthic Week…

We here at the Benthic Times are tickled pink to announce the commencement of our latest venture, The Benthic Press. We are now in the business of publishing, and our initial publication will be the much anticipated collection of the first four Jennings and Jennings stories. This is working its way through the behemoth called Amazon even as we speak.

We are also thinking to produce an anthology of other writers’ stories, offer some editing/proofing services, build a small artificial island with a giant laser on it and so forth. In short, we have big dreams.

Yes, yes, that’s all very well, I hear you mutter, but what’s this Benthic Week malarkey? Well, to celebrate the creation of the press and the immanent release of the book, we have decided to have one whole week of daily posts. Now, we see you gasp in amazement! Yes, it’s true. We have already started with the epilogue for The Cornish Curse and will start, from tomorrow, our latest story: The Sunnyport Shadow.

welcome to sunnyport

This new story is inspired by two sources of existential dread and horror, by two elements which cause one to question one’s meaning in a cruel universe, one’s significance in the face of total indifference, and even one’s sanity. I refer to firstly, the writings of HP Lovecraft and secondly, a British seaside holiday in inclement weather.

Ah, now everything is clear, you say. Of course, the pause in posts was merely to create anticipation for this schmorgasbord of Benthic delights. Sadly, there we must hang our heads and confess. For in truth, the Benthic Times has relocated home once again and whilst we try to prevent personal obstacles from blocking our posting habits, this time it got the better of us. We trust that the Benthic Week, culminating in the release of the book, will suffice as apology and recompense.

Yours

Paul Michael and Josephine Pichette

Complimentary Literature

“Nice hat, it’s really rather fetching.”

Alternately, there is this…for modern devices.

http://madeleinedeste.com/2016/08/06/science-fiction-and-fantasy-free-book-promo-6th-and-7th-august/

 

Cup of Brown Joy and the Silv’ry Tay

This very evening we shall be repairing to local hostelry The Yellow Book to hear the work of a young poet called Professor Elemental. I’m not sure which academic institute awarded him this title, so cannot speak on that point, but I have heard that he is a first rate wordsmith. Interestingly, there is a novelty element to his literature in that he has set his work to a sort of rhythmic drumming. This shall be interesting to observe although frankly I don’t think this sort of thing is likely to catch on. 

But thinking of great poetry set to music I was reminded of the famous poet William McGonagall whose own ode The Famous Tay Whale was  set to music.  Those unfamiliar with Mr McGonagall’s work are urged to seek it out forthwith. His use of language and masterful command of metre are truly breathtaking.

McGonagall

Of course famous though this work is, perhaps his greatest poem is The Tay Bridge Disaster. The opening and ending are included here to allow you, gentle Reader, to bask in wonder at the power of this work. So evocative and profound is this writing, it has been known to reduce men to tears.

Beautiful Railway Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay!
Alas! I am very sorry to say
That ninety lives have been taken away
On the last Sabbath day of 1879,
Which will be remember’d for a very long time.

¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨

It must have been an awful sight,
To witness in the dusky moonlight,
While the Storm Fiend did laugh, and angry did bray,
Along the Railway Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay,
Oh! ill-fated Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay,
I must now conclude my lay
By telling the world fearlessly without the least dismay,
That your central girders would not have given way,
At least many sensible men do say,
Had they been supported on each side with buttresses,
At least many sensible men confesses,
For the stronger we our houses do build,
The less chance we have of being killed.